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Is it a bad idea to sell poorly cut handcut stones?

This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of abrugger abrugger 2 weeks, 4 days ago.

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  • #232822
    Profile photo of abrugger
    abrugger
    Participant

    I’m a self-taught hobby gem faceter and I’m still struggling with getting perfect meetpoints and consistent girdle thickness. I’m using my own Graves Mark IV and I never feel like I’m getting accurate angles, in addition to my low skill level overall. I clearly see my errors the moment I overcut something, and I will recut, but there’s only so much recutting before I decide I better call it “good enough” and start fresh. My dop transfers are sloppy but I’m getting better in everything every time I cut something. However, I wanted to know if those of you who professionally cut gemstones to sell think it is ok for me to offer my stones for sale when they aren’t perfect? What did you do when you were learning? I’ve even had people ask me to cut their rough but I turn them down because I know I can’t cut to perfection and don’t want to ruin it.

    My ability to take close-up photos prevents me from fully showing my poor meetpoints and I don’t really know the value of my poorly cut stones – however, I can say confidently that even my poorly cut stones are more beautiful than the commercially cut stones in abundance (and even a lot of those have sloppy meetpoints) plus my cuts are fancy ones. Thus far I’ve been putting my stones in my own handmade jewelry to compensate for the cut but I always feel bad when someone asks me how much and I tell them my asking price (even though it is maybe a 10th of what a professional gem cutter would charge). I still spend a lot of time and effort to make it.

    So…I guess the question is, how “perfect” does a cut have to be before you can sell it to the public and not offend the professional gem cutters out there? and if it isn’t perfect, without being a gemologist, is there a rough gauge to use to know what kind of price discount is appropriate to compensate without giving the stones away?

    Sorry for the long post and thanks for reading!

    Andrea

    #232861
    Profile photo of tomi-jc
    tomi-jc
    Participant

    Hello Andrea! I’m not a faceter/cutter (yet… starting to learn faceting myself too….) but I’m a small scale gem dealer and this is my advice for your poorly cut gemstones. You can sell those poorly cut gemstones as long as you disclose that they are poorly cut as like you have to disclose if the gemstones are treated somehow. Almost all of the gembuyers expect to get/buy a good stone and it will be a big disappointment to the buyers to find out that an expensive stone is poorly cut. If you don’t disclose the poor cut you will lose your reputation and you are not able to sell your stones. Many gemstones are poorly cut and they need to be recut which means spending extra money and time for recutting them. That’s why many buyers avoid poor cut gemstones. My advice to you is to practice more with very cheap and maybe synthetic rough stones and so you’ll get to be a better cutter. You can ask someone experienced cutter to help you and give you advice….

    #232863
    Profile photo of tomi-jc
    tomi-jc
    Participant

    …You should give about 15% discount for poor cut gemstones and tell that the poor cut is taken in consideration in the price….

    #234019
    Profile photo of abrugger
    abrugger
    Participant

    Thank you for the feedback, I appreciate it. You make a good point about reputation as I do hope to be able to cut a perfect stone someday.

    I think some of my problems have to do with perhaps my machine as I never feel like when I clamp in an angle that it is very accurate because of how much things wiggle. And any facet that falls around index 57 always seems to be off, so I have to do a lot of “cheating” and can’t cut by ear for those at all, so I basically lightly touch for a split second and then pull out my loupe and repeat. Seems like an odd thing to happen if it is just my abilities going haywire when I hit the 50s…but who knows. Would like to upgrade to a “professional” faceting machine someday so I can hopefully rule out any calibration problems.

    I will certainly disclose the poor cut and make a note about discounts applied. I appreciate the suggested discount too as I had no idea. Right now I practically give them away but it’s disheartening.

    Thank you!

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