Stichtite Value, Price, and Jewelry Information

STICHTITE: Argent Hill, Tasmania, Australia (specimen ~ 2 inches across). Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.

Stichtite

Stichtite is not facetable, but the pink color is quite striking in cabochons. Cut stones are especially beautiful when there are other minerals present to add splashes of green and yellow. This material somewhat resembles a pink, granular material from the USSR referred to as canasite.

Stichtite Information

Data Value
Name Stichtite
Colors Lilac to rose pink.
Crystallography Hexagonal (R). Massive, foliated, fibrous, lamellar, scaly.
Refractive Index 1.518-1.545
Luster Pearly, waxy, greasy.
Hardness 1.5-2.5.
Fracture Uneven
Specific Gravity 2.16 (Quebec); 2.22 (South Africa).
Birefringence 0.027
Cleavage Perfect 1 direction
Stone Sizes Massive material is sometime cut into cabochons, but the material is usually used to carve decorative objects such as ashtrays and bookends. The color is usually lilac to purplish, often veined with green serpentine, and the color combination is quite handsome. Blocks weighing several pounds are obtainable.
Luminescence None.
Luminescence Present No
Transparency Translucent to opaque.
Absorption Spectrum Typical Cr spectrum: 3 lines in the red at 6655 to 6300.
Formula

Mg6Cr2(CO3)(OH)16· 4H2O.

Pleochroism

Light to dark red.

Optics

o = 1.545; e = 1.518. Uniaxial (-). Shadow edge seen at about 1.53.

Optic Sign Uniaxial -

Dimorph of Barbertonite.

Has a greasy feel.

Streak: White to lilac.

Optics: o=1.545; e =1.518.

Uniaxial (-).

Shadow edge seen at about 1.53.

Occurrence: In serpentine rocks, usually associated with chromite.

Black Lake, Quebec, Canada.

Dundas, Tasmania: mixed with green serpentine.

Transvaal, South Africa; Algeria.

Comments: Stichtite is not facetable, but the pink color is quite striking in cabochons. Cut stones are especially beautiful when there are other minerals present to add splashes of green and yellow. This material somewhat resembles a pink, granular material from the USSR referred to as canasite.

Name: After Robert Sticht of Tasmania, general manager of the Mt. Lyell Mining and Railway Co.