Analcime Value, Price, and Jewelry Information


Analcime
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0 [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Large colorless crystals of Analcime are a great rarity although small transparent crystals are abundant. Faceted gems are extremely rare and seldom seen even in large collections. The hardness is marginal for wear, but the mineral has no cleavage and should present no difficulties in cutting.

Analcime Value

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Analcime Information

DataValue
NameAnalcime
Crystallography Isometric; good crystals are common, usually trapezohedra. Massive, granular.
Colors Colorless, white, gray, yellowish, pink, greenish.
Luster Vitreous.
Fracture Subconchoidal. Brittle.
Hardness 5-5.5
Specific Gravity 2.22 - 2.29
Birefringence Anomalous in polarized light.
Cleavage Indistinct.
Stone SizesGems are nearly always colorless and less than 1-2 carats when faceted. Large crystals from Mt. Ste. Hilaire are white but may have small facetable areas. Crystals in basaltic cavities in general do not exceed ¼ inch in size and are transparent.
Luminescence Cream white in LW (Golden, Colorado).
Spectral Not diagnostic
FormulaNaAlSi2O6 · H2O
Pleochroism None

Optics: Isotropic; N = 1.479-1.493.

Occurrence: Secondary mineral in basic igneous rocks; also in sedimentary rocks such as siltstones and sandstones. Washington, Oregon, and California (Columbia Plateau area).

Houghton County, Michigan.

New Jersey: Watchung basalt flows.

India: Deccan Plateau.

Nova Scotia: Bay of Fundy area.

Mt. Ste. Hilaire, Quebec, Canada.

Also Scotland, Ireland, Iceland, Norway, Italy, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Australia.

Comments: Large colorless crystals of Analcime are a great rarity although small transparent crystals are abundant. Faceted gems are extremely rare and seldom seen even in large collections. The hardness is marginal for wear, but the mineral has no cleavage and should present no difficulties in cutting.

Name: From the Greek analkis, meaning weak, because of the weak electric charge analcime develops when it is rubbed.