Samarskite Value, Price, and Jewelry Information

“Samarskite – Y,” Setesdal, Aust-Agder County, Norway. © Rob Lavinsky, www.iRocks.com. Used with permission.

Samarskite

Samarskite is a very heavy material from which lustrous black to brownish cabochons are sometimes cut as curiosities. The material is rather brittle and is not intended for wear. It is rarely seen or displayed since black stones are not terribly attractive. Sometimes a stone is faceted in the nature of jet or marcasite.

Samarskite Information

Data Value
Name Samarskite
Stone Sizes Large cabochons can be cut from masses found at various localities. This material is essentially opaque.
Formula (Y, Ce, U, Ca, Pb)(Nb,Ta,Ti,Sn)2O6
Colors Velvety black, yellowish brown on exterior.
Fracture Conchoidal
Hardness 5-6
Cleavage Indistinct
Crystallography Monoclinic. Crystals rough, tabular: massive, compact.
Refractive Index 2.20
Luminescence None.
Luminescence Present No
Pleochroism None.
Optics Isotropic; N = 2.20 (variable). Isotropic nature caused by metamictization.
Luster Dull after alteration; resinous; vitreous, submetallic.
Specific Gravity 5.25-5.69 (variable), usually near upper end of range.
Transparency Opaque.

SAMARSKITE See also: Euxenite, Fergusonite.

Samarskite Information

Streak: Black to reddish brown.

Optics: Isotropic; N = 2.20 (variable).

Isotropic nature caused by metamictization.

Occurrence: A widespread pegmatite mineral.

North Carolina; Colorado.

USSR; Norway; Madagascar; Zaire; Japan; Minas Gerais, Brazil; Madras. India.

Comments: Samarskite is a very heavy material from which lustrous black to brownish cabochons are sometimes cut as curiosities. The material is rather brittle and is not intended for wear. It is rarely seen or displayed since black stones are not terribly attractive. Sometimes a stone is faceted in the nature of jet or marcasite.

Name: ln honor of Colonel Samarski, a Russian mining official.

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