faceted brazilianite - Corrego Frio, Brazilfaceted brazilianite - Corrego Frio, Brazil

Brazilianite Value, Price, and Jewelry Information


Brazilianite's lovely green to yellow colors make it a must for gem collectors. Large faceted stones are often flawed, but smaller cut gems can make beautiful jewelry pieces.

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Brazilianite’s lovely green to yellow colors make it a must for gem collectors. Large faceted stones are often flawed, but smaller cut gems can make beautiful jewelry pieces.

faceted brazilianite - Corrego Frio, Brazil
Faceted brazilianite, 12.2 cts, 1.9 x 1.0 x 0.7 cm, Corrego Frio mine (type locality), Linopolis, Divino das Laranjeiras, Doce valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil. © Rob Lavinsky, www.iRocks.com. Used with permission.

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Brazilianite Value

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faceted brazilianite
Brazilianite (6.73). Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.
brazilianites - linopolis, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Brazilianites on matrix, 10.0 x 7.5 x 7.2 cm, Telirio Mine, Linopolis, Minas Gerais, Brazil. © Rob Lavinsky, www.iRocks.com. Used with permission.

Does Brazilianite Make a Good Jewelry Stone?

Although brazilianites have a moderate hardness, they also have good cleavage and a tendency to fracture. Thus, protective settings and occasional wear are good ideas if you want to wear these gems in jewelry, especially rings.

Discovered in Brazil in 1944, brazilianites are primarily collector's gemstones. Many museums display large, uncut brazilianites as stunning crystal specimens. Although pieces such as these could yield large gems, clean faceted gems over 15 carats are a great rarity.

  • cushion-cut brazilianite 1
  • cushion-cut brazilianite 2
  • cushion-cut brazilianite 3

    Yellowish green brazilianite, 2.23 cts, 8.7 x 6.8 x 5.4 mm, cushion cut, Brazil. © ARK Rare Gems. Used with permission.

    Where is Brazilianite Found?

    Brazil, notably Conselheira Pena, Minas Gerais, remains the principal source of gem quality material in crystals up to large sizes.

    faceted brazilianite - Brazil
    Brazilianite: Brazil (3.2). Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.

    The Palermo Mine in Grafton, New Hampshire and sites in Yukon, Canada also yield fine but smaller specimens.

    brazilianites - Canada
    Brazilianites, Rapid Creek, Yukon, Canada. © Rob Lavinsky, www.iRocks.com. Used with permission.

    Stone Sizes

    Crystals from Brazil range in size up to 12 x 8 cm. Although some large gems have been cut, most gems range from one to ten carats, or even smaller. Cut stones over five carats are scarce today.

    brazilianites - New Hampshire
    Some of the sharp, yellow brazilianites inside this quartz vug reach 1.1 cm. That's very large for this locality. The specimen measures 10.8 x 10.3 x 8.9 cm. Palermo Mine, North Groton, New Hampshire, USA. © Rob Lavinsky, www.iRocks.com. Used with permission.
    • American Museum of Natural History (New York): 23 (emerald cut, Brazil), 19 (round, yellow).
    • Smithsonian Institution (Washington, DC): 41.9 and 17.0 (yellow, Brazil).
    • Private Collection: 24 (yellow, Brazil).
    Cut brazilianites - 0.78 and 2.00 cts
    Cut brazilianites, 0.78 and 2.00 cts. Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.

    How to Care for Brazilianites

    Heating brazilianite gems up to 140º C/284º F can lead to color loss. Heating up to 300º C/572º F will turn them colorless. A jeweler's torch will easily reach these temperatures, so be wary if you're taking a jewelry piece for repairs. Avoid mechanical cleaning such as steam or ultrasonic processes. Instead, use a soft brush, mild detergent, and warm water for cleaning. Consult our gemstone jewelry cleaning guide for more recommendations.

    Brazilianite - faceted gems
    Brazilianite: Brazil, (3.0, 2.7). Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.

    Joel E. Arem, Ph.D., FGA

    Dr. Joel E. Arem has more than 60 years of experience in the world of gems and minerals. After obtaining his Ph.D. in Mineralogy from Harvard University, he has published numerous books that are still among the most widely used references and guidebooks on crystals, gems and minerals in the world.

    Co-founder and President of numerous organizations, Dr. Arem has enjoyed a lifelong career in mineralogy and gemology. He has been a Smithsonian scientist and Curator, a consultant to many well-known companies and institutions, and a prolific author and speaker. Although his main activities have been as a gem cutter and dealer, his focus has always been education. joelarem.com


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