Wardite Value, Price, and Jewelry Information


Wardite
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0 [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Wardite is another of the many phosphates that have been cut by collectors. It is pale colored and not terribly attractive and is fairly soft and fragile. It is seen far more frequently as cabochons than as faceted stones.

Wardite Value

The International Gem Society (IGS) has a list of businesses offering gemstone appraisal services.

Wardite Information

DataValue
NameWardite
Crystallography Tetragonal. Crystals pyramidal; as crusts, aggregates, fibers, spherules.
Colors Colorless, white, pale green to bluish green.
Luster Vitreous.
Fracture Conchoidal. Brittle.
Hardness 5
Specific Gravity 2.81-2.87.
Birefringence 0.009
Cleavage Perfect 1 direction.
Stone SizesFaceted gems are very rare, cut from Brazilian material. Cabochons are cut of white wardite mixed with green variscite from Utah. Faceted gems would all be under 2—3 carats in size.
Luminescence None
Spectral Not diagnostic
FormulaNaAl3(PO4)2(OH)4 · 2H2O.
Pleochroism None

Optics: 0 = 1.586—l.594; e = l.595—1.(>O4.

Uniaxial (+).

Sometimes anomalously biaxial.

Occurrence: In phosphate masses in sediments, and in pegmatites.

Keystone, South Dakota; Pala, California.

Fairfield, Utah: in large nodules with variscite and other phosphates. Also at Amatrice Hill, Lucin, Utah.

Montebras, France: as an alteration of amblygonite.

West Andover, New Hampshire: in crystals to 1 cm.

Piedras Lavradas, Paraiba, Brazil: greenish white crystals to about 1 inch.

Comments: Wardite is another of the many phosphates that have been cut by collectors. It is pale colored and not terribly attractive and is fairly soft and fragile. It is seen far more frequently as cabochons than as faceted stones.

Name: After Henry A. Ward, American naturalist and collector.