Cobaltite Value, Price, and Jewelry Information

Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0 [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Cobaltite

Cabochons are interesting because of the lovely reddish metallic appearance of this mineral. Cut stones are infrequently seen and are cut only as a curiosity by the collector who wants to have one of everything.

Cobaltite Information

Data Value
Name Cobaltite
Stone Sizes Massive material would cut stones of any desired size.
Formula CoAsS.
Colors Silvery white to reddish, steel gray with a violet tinge; blackish gray.
Fracture Uneven
Hardness 5.5
Cleavage Perfect 1 direction
Crystallography Orthorhombic. Crystals usually cubes and pyritohedra or combinations of forms; also massive; granular.
Luminescence None.
Luminescence Present No
Absorption Spectrum Not diagnostic.
Pleochroism None.
Luster Metallic.
Specific Gravity 6.3
Transparency Opaque.

Streak: Grayish black.

Occurrence: High temperature deposits, in metamorphosed rocks, and in vein deposits. Colorado; Idaho; California.

Dashkesan, Ajerbaijan, USSR; India: Sonora, Mexico; Tunaberg, Sweden; Norway; Cerrnany; Cornwall. England; Western Australia. Cobalt, Ontario: in masses and fine crystals.

Comments: Cabochons are interesting because of the lovely reddish metallic appearance of this mineral. Cut stones are infrequently seen and are cut only as a curiosity by the collector who wants to have one of everything.

Name: From the composition.

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