The Art and Science of Identifying Gemstones


Step 3: Practical Gemology

Lesson 25

Trigon inclusions are part of a natural, uncut diamond's original crystal structure. These were photographed on the surface of a rough diamond through a microscope. If trigons are found on a faceted gemstone girdle, it's a good indication the stone is a natural diamond. Identifying inclusions is just one step in the process of identifying gemstones. “Diamond Face Trigons Scale” by Gump Stump is licensed under CC By-SA 3.0
Trigon inclusions are part of a natural, uncut diamond’s original crystal structure. These were photographed on the surface of a rough diamond through a microscope. If trigons are found on a faceted gemstone girdle, it’s one indication the stone is possibly a natural diamond. Identifying inclusions is just one step in the process of identifying gemstones. “Diamond Face Trigons Scale” by Gump Stump is licensed under CC By-SA 3.0

One of the biggest mistakes beginning gemologists make when identifying gemstones is over-relying on data. After conducting some initial tests, they consult long lists of potential species. It’s easy to get lost in a sea of data and overlook important clues. Gemology is as much art as science, and relying strictly on analytical skills can hamper your work. Learning gemology requires not just practicing testing techniques but …

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