morganite - triangular cushion cut
morganite - triangular cushion cut

Morganite Value, Price, and Jewelry Information


A member of the beryl family, morganite shows a range of pink colors due to traces of manganese. Recently, this gemstone has seen an increase in popularity and value.

2 Minute Read

A member of the beryl family, morganite shows a range of pink colors due to traces of manganese. Recently, this gemstone has seen an increase in popularity and value.

morganite - triangular cushion cut
Morganite. 2.41-ct, triangular cushion cut, 10.01 × 10.16 ×6.40 mm, irradiated, EC1. Cut by Peter Torraca. © Torraca Gemcutting. Used with permission.

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Morganite Value

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Medium light to medium pink, clean stones with custom cuts are the most valuable. Very light and included stones are on the lower end of the value spectrum.

As morganite frequently occurs in larger crystals, there is no exponential increase in price with carat weight. Paradoxically, smaller morganites, if they show good color, can be more valuable than larger ones. In order to show good color, large stones must be so large that they’re impractical for use as jewelry.

As is the case with unheated greenish blue aquamarine, a small but growing segment of collectors prefer the unheated peachy color of morganite and are willing to pay a premium to get an unenhanced, natural piece.

For more information on morganite value factors, consult our buying guide.

morganites
Morganites (42.5, 10). Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.
morganites - Madagascar
After the discovery of morganite in Madagascar in 1910, Tiffany & Co introduced this gem to the American market. They named it in honor of the financier J. P. Morgan, who was himself reputed to be an avid gem collector. Pear-cut morganites, 11.61 ctw, Madagascar. Photo courtesy of liveauctioneers.com and Gems Auction.

Does Morganite Make a Good Jewelry Stone?

Like most beryls, morganite makes an excellent jewelry stone. It has both the hardness and durability for daily wear in any kind of jewelry.

Although violet and peach are possible morganite colors, the most common color for this stone is pink. Many gem and jewelry enthusiasts prefer pink, though some prefer peach.

morganite and diamond engagement ring
A stunning halo ring, pairing a warm morganite center with a halo of diamonds, and set on a delicate diamond pavé rose gold shank. Photo by CustomMade. Used with permission.

Is Morganite a "Pink Emerald?"

The beryl family includes some well-known gems, such as aquamarines and emeralds. Aquamarines, emeralds, and morganites belong to the same gem species — beryl. However, they are distinct varieties of beryl, and the term "pink emerald" shouldn't be used for morganite.

Unfortunately, some vendors reference well-known gem names to drum up interest (and prices) for another gem. Beryls in particular receive these names from dishonest sellers because of the popularity of emeralds and aquamarines in particular. Although morganites are very rare, their prices don't approach those of emeralds. To insinuate that morganites are a sub-variety of one of the most expensive gems on the market is misleading.

Likewise, you might encounter near colorless beryl specimens offered for sale as morganites. These stones should be labeled more properly as goshenite (colorless beryl). Just as emeralds command higher prices than morganites, morganites command higher prices than goshenites.

Are There Synthetic Morganites?

You can find hydrothermally grown synthetic morganites for sale as jewelry stones. If you're not sure whether your gem is natural or lab-grown, send it to a gemological lab for analysis.

Heat treatments and light will remove the yellow component from peach morganite, so it's sometimes heated to get "pinker" stones.

Where are Morganites Found?

Minas Gerais, Brazil produces fine crystals and gem material.

morganite - brazil
This crystal specimen features a morganite on a schorl matrix. Urucum Mine, Minas Gerais, Brazil. © Rob Lavinsky, www.iRocks.com. Used with permission.

Other locations producing gem-quality material include the following:

  • United States: San Diego County, California (in several localities, fine crystals and gem material); Maine; Thomas Range, Utah.
  • Madagascar: in pegmatites and as alluvial material.
  • Afghanistan; Mozambique; Myanmar; Namibia; Pakistan.

A pink-peach morganite crystal from the Himalaya Mine, Mesa Grande, San Diego County, California. Video © Rob Lavinsky, www.iRocks.com. Used with permission.

Stone Sizes

Morganites don't usually occur in sizes as large as other beryls. However, in 1989, Ronald and Dennis Holden discovered a morganite measuring 30 cm wide at the Bennett Quarry in Maine. As rough, the "Rose of Maine" weighed 115,000 cts, approximately 50 lbs, the largest ever found in North America. This specimen yielded several cut gems, including a 184-ct faceted piece now residing at the Maine State Museum.

  • Smithsonian Institution (Washington, DC): 287 (pink, Brazil) and 235 (pink, Brazil); 178 (pink, California); 113 (peach, California); 56 (pale pink, Madagascar); 330 (dark orange, Brazil).
  • Natural Hist. Museum, Paris: 250 (pink, Madagascar).
  • Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto, Ontario, Canada): 1,625 (orangish pink, rectangular faceted scissor-cut, Brazil); 118.6 (pink, cat's eye).
  • British Museum (Natural History) (London England): 598.7 (rich pink, square-cushion brilliant, Madagascar); rose-red crystal from California weighing 9 pounds.
  • American Museum of Natural History (New York): 58.8 (heart-shaped, Madagascar).
  • Private Collection: three very large cut gems with carved tables, total weight ~ 1,500 carats, tables carved in religious motifs.
morganite - Royal Ontario Museum
An unusually large, faceted morganite, 1,625 cts, 76.4 x 57 x 51.2 mm, at the Royal Ontario Museum. Photo by Feline Groovy. Licensed under CC By-ND 2.0.

Caring for Your Morganite Gemstones

If free of inclusions or fractures, morganites may be cleaned using mechanical systems. Have a gemologist examine your gems first to identify any potential weaknesses. However, a soft brush, mild detergent, and warm water will always work safely.

Consult our gemstone jewelry cleaning guide for more recommendations.

faceted morganites
Morganites. Photo courtesy of Barbara Smigel at Artistic Colored Stones.

Joel E. Arem, Ph.D., FGA

Dr. Joel E. Arem has more than 60 years of experience in the world of gems and minerals. After obtaining his Ph.D. in Mineralogy from Harvard University, he has published numerous books that are still among the most widely used references and guidebooks on crystals, gems and minerals in the world.

Co-founder and President of numerous organizations, Dr. Arem has enjoyed a lifelong career in mineralogy and gemology. He has been a Smithsonian scientist and Curator, a consultant to many well-known companies and institutions, and a prolific author and speaker. Although his main activities have been as a gem cutter and dealer, his focus has always been education. joelarem.com


Donald Clark, CSM IMG

The late Donald Clark, CSM founded the International Gem Society in 1998. Donald started in the gem and jewelry industry in 1976. He received his formal gemology training from the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) and the American Society of Gemcutters (ASG). The letters “CSM” after his name stood for Certified Supreme Master Gemcutter, a designation of Wykoff’s ASG which has often been referred to as the doctorate of gem cutting. The American Society of Gemcutters only had 54 people reach this level. Along with dozens of articles for leading trade magazines, Donald authored the book “Modern Faceting, the Easy Way.”


Barbara Smigel, PhD. GG

Barbara Smigel is a GIA certified gemologist, facetor, jewelry designer, gem dealer, gemology instructor and creator of the well-regarded educational websites acstones.com and bwsmigel.info.


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