Smith Bar: Online Faceting Designs & Diagrams


Summary
Jeff Graham’s Smith Bar gem design is easy to cut. One Smith Bar gem has even found its way into the Smithsonian Institution. Learn the story behind this museum piece.
Reading time: 2 min 5 sec
Smith Bar gem design © Jeff Graham.
Smith Bar gem design © Jeff Graham.

You can find cutting instructions for the Smith Bar here.

Tension Bracelet with Smith Bar Tourmaline

Smith Bar - tourmaline
This bracelet by Sam Patania was added to the collection of the Smithsonian Institution in 2000. It features a green tourmaline, approximately 10 cts and 9.5 mm x 16 mm, cut in a Smith Bar design by Jeff Graham.

This photo, taken for a show at the Tucson Art Museum, doesn’t do the stone a lot of justice. The flawless, medium forest-green tourmaline has some blue overtones you can’t see here. The Smith Bar-cut stone is tension mounted in a white gold bracelet by third generation jewelry artisan Sam Patania.

A curator from the Smithsonian Institution saw the piece at the show and spoke with Mr. Patania about submitting it (and two other pieces by his father and grandfather) to the museum. It’s now on display at the Renwick Gallery.

Cutting Remarks

The Smith Bar cuts in quartz with no changes. Notice the lowest angle on the pavilion is 41°. It can have almost any length to width ratio (L/W) with no changes. It also works well in tourmaline that’s dark or closed on the c-axis. You can cut the corners in or leave them pointed.

Enjoy cutting your own Smith Bar.

Smith Bar - array
Random – Cosine – ISO

Detailed faceting instructions by Jeff Graham available at The Rock Peddler

About the author
Jeff R. Graham
The late Jeff Graham was a prolific faceter, creator of many original faceting designs, and the author of several highly-regarded instructional faceting books such as Gram Faceting Designs.
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