Witherite Value, Price, and Jewelry Information


WITHERITE: England (1.89). Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.

Witherite is very rarely faceted; if it is faceted, it is quite rare. Stones are not especially beautiful, and they are soft and fragile as well. Their only major attribute is rarity. Witherite is fairly easy to cut but somewhat difficult to polish.

Witherite Value

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Witherite Information

DataValue
NameWitherite
Crystallography Orthorhombic. Crystals twinned to yield pseudohexagonal dipyramids; prismatic; globular, botryoidal; granular; fibrous.
Colors Colorless, white, gray with a tinge of yellow, green, or brown.
Luster Vitreous to resinous.
Fracture Uneven. Brittle.
Hardness 3-3.5.
Specific Gravity 4.27-4.79.
Birefringence 0.148.
Cleavage Distinct 1 direction.
Stone SizesWitherite is not normally cut into cabochons because the color is too pale to be attractive. Faceted gems, even those under 5 carats, are usually more translucent than transparent.
Luminescence Green and yellow in SW (England) with phosphorescence. Yellowish, with phosphorescence, in LW. Fluoresces in X-rays.
Spectral Not diagnostic. Effervesces in acid.
FormulaBaCO3.

WITHERITE Series to Strontianite: SrCO3.

Optics: a= 1.529; /3 = 1.676; y l 1.677.

Biaxial (-), 2V 116°.

Occurrence: A low-temperature mineral in hydrothermal vein deposits.

Lockport, New York; Kentucky; Montana; Arizona; California.

Austria; Germany; Czechoslovakia; France; Japan; USSR; England.

Minerva Mine, Rosiclare, Illinois: large yellowish crystals.

Comments: Witherite is very rarely faceted; if it is faceted, it is quite rare. Stones are not especially beautiful, and they are soft and fragile as well. Their only major attribute is rarity. Witherite is fairly easy to cut but somewhat difficult to polish.

Name: After William Withering, an English physician and mineralogist, who first noted the mineral.