Fluorite Value, Price, and Jewelry Information


FLUORITE: Africa (62.55), New Hampshire (152.90), Illinois (17.55), New Hampshire (38.10). Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.

Fluorite is too fragile for wear because of its cleavage and brittleness. It is also on the soft side for jewelry use. Fluorite does, however, occur in a very wide range of attractive colors. Faceted gems can be extremely bright, despite the low index of refraction, since the material takes a high polish. Most of the available stones are in the blue-violet-green range; pinks are rare as is the fine chrome-green material from Colombia. Bicolor gems are sometimes cut from zoned crystals. An English fluorite with an alexandrite like color change (pink-blue) has been reported, as has similar material from Cherbadung, Switzerland. Large fluorites totally free of internal flaws are extremely rare.

Fluorite Value

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Fluorite Information

DataValue
NameFluorite
VarietiesBlue John
Crystallography Isometric. Usually in good crystals, cubes, octahedra, and other forms, often twinned; also massive, granular.
Colors An extremely wide range is represented: colorless, purple (various shades), green (various shades), blue-green, blue, yellow to orange, brown (various shades), white, pink, red, brownish red, pinkish red, brownish black, black. Crystals are frequently color-zoned.
Luster Vitreous
Fracture Quite brittle.
Hardness 4
Specific Gravity 3.180; massive material with impurities 3.0-3.25.
Cleavage Perfect 4 directions. Cleavage is octahedral, very easy.
Dispersion 0.007 (very low)
Stone SizesFluorites can be very large because of the availability of suitable rough from a wide range of localities. Many fluorite crystals are transparent. Smithsonian Institution (Washington, D.C): 729 (green, Colombia); 492, 354 (pink, Korea); 348 (pale blue, Korea); 263, 234 (light brown, Africa); 118 (purple, England); 354 (pale yellow, Illinois); 229, 124.5 (green, New Hampshire); 117 (green, Africa); 111.2 (violet, Illinois); 118.5, 85.4 (blue, Illinois); 32.7 (colorless, Illinois); 13 (pink, Switzerland). Devonian Group (Calgary, Alberta, Canada): 68 (deep blue, Namibia), 23.7 (pink, Africa); 72.4 (green). Harvard University: 180 (green, New Hampshire). Los Angeles County Museum (Los Angeles): 1031 (yellow, triangle, Cave-in-Rock, Illinois, world's largest yellow fluorite); 100 (chrome fluorite, Colombia); 30 (chrome fluorite, Azusa Canyon, Los Angeles County, California). Private Collection: 100+ (pink, South Africa); 203.5 (yellow, Illinois); 17.92 (brown, Michigan); 3969 (Kashmir-sapphire blue. Illinois).
Luminescence Yellow, blue, white, reddish, violet, green in LW. Fluorescence likely due to U and rare earths, sometimes to organic inclusions (hydrocarbons). Some material is thermoluminescent; some is phosphorescent. Phosphoresces in X-rays. Subject of luminescence and fluorescence began with studies of fluorite.
Spectral U and rare earths are often present; spectrum reflects their presence. Spectra usually vague, however. Green material has lines at 6340, 6100, 5820, and 4450 and a broad band at 4270.
FormulaCaF2

Optics:  isotropic; N= 1.432-1.434.

Occurrence: In hydrothermal deposits; sedimentary rocks; hot springs; rarely in pegmatites; usually associated with sulfide ore deposits, There are many localities worldwide. New Mexico; Colorado; Michigan.

FLOURITE: Colombia (3.05); Switzerland (0.92), Illinois (15.80) // Illinois (5.75), England (6.05), Illinois (8.80)
FLUORITE: Colombia (3.05); Switzerland (0.92), Illinois (15.80) // Illinois (5.75), England (6.05), Illinois (8.80). Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.

Italy; South Afriea; Austria; Czechoslovakia; Germany; Korea; Africa; USSR.

England: Blue John or Derbyshire Spar used for more than fifteen hundred years as decorative material in vases, carvings, bowls, and so forth. It is banded in white and shades of blue, violet, and reddish brown. Derbyshire deposits now exhausted. Also from Cumberland and Cornwall.

Chamonix, Switzerland; octahedral pink crystals, on quartz, very rare.

Illinois; best known, especially violet material from Rosiclare. Occurs in many colors in Illinois, also Missouri (purple, blue, yellow, brown, colorless).

Westmoreland, New Hampshire: bright green fluorite in crystals up to 8 inches across.

Ontario, Canada: banded, violet material in calcite.

Colombia: (green).

Huanzala, Peru: pink crystals.

FLOURITE: Illinois (1031, world’s largest of this color)
FLUORITE: Illinois (1031, world’s largest of this color). Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.

Comments: Fluorite is too fragile for wear because of its cleavage and brittleness. It is also on the soft side for jewelry use. Fluorite does, however, occur in a very wide range of attractive colors. Faceted gems can be extremely bright, despite the low index of refraction, since the material takes a high polish. Most of the available stones are in the blue-violet-green range; pinks are rare as is the fine chrome-green material from Colombia. Bicolor gems are sometimes cut from zoned crystals. An English fluorite with an alexandrite like color change (pink-blue) has been reported, as has similar material from Cherbadung, Switzerland. Large fluorites totally free of internal flaws are extremely rare.

Name: From the Latin fluere (to flow) because it melts easily and is used as a flux in smelting.