Topaz Value

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Imperial - Top Color: oR, R 5/5

.5 to 1 carat
Imperial
- /ct
1 to 3 carats
Imperial
to /ct
3 carats plus
Imperial
to /ct

Pink

.5 to 3 carat
Pink
to /ct
3 carats plus
Pink
to /ct

Blues & Colorless - Top Color: vslgB, gB 5/5

.5 to 1 carat
London Blue
to
Swiss Blue
to /ct
Sky Blue
to /ct
Colorless
to /ct
1 carat plus
London Blue
to /ct
Swiss Blue
to /ct
Sky Blue
to /ct
Colorless
to /ct

Other Colors

All Sizes
Faceted
to /ct

Cabochons

All Sizes
Blue
to /ct
View Topaz Profile

The International Gem Society (IGS) has a list of businesses offering gemstone appraisal services.

Although clarity and size have a significant effect on the value of topaz, color has the greatest impact on pricing.

The highest values go to the rare pink and red stones, then orange and yellow. Intense, reddish orange topaz is sometimes called “imperial topaz.” Yellow, orange, and brown stones are somewhat common. Colorless topazes are common and are low-value gems in any size.

pink topaz - Russia

Topaz, Russia, (17.84). Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.

The term “precious topaz” refers to stones with a rich yellow to a medium, peachy orange color.

precious topaz - Brazil

Oval-cut precious topaz, 11.30 cts, Brazil. Photo © Joel E. Arem, PhD, FGA. Used with permission.

Blue has become the most popular color for topazes on the market today. However, almost all such gems began as colorless or pale blue topazes. A safe and very common heat-and-radiation treatment gives them striking, darker colors. Blue topazes are very inexpensive.

Swiss blue topaz

Oval-cut, “Swiss blue” topaz, 6.55 cts, 12.10 x 9.80 x 7.31 mm, Brazil. Photo courtesy of liveauctioneers.com and Jasper52.

For more information on topaz quality factors, consult our buying guide and engagement ring guide.