Amethyst Value

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Faceted - Top Color: P, bP 7/5

.5 to 1 carat
Siberian
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Medium
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Light
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1 carat plus
Siberian
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Medium
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Light
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Cabochons

1 carat plus
Dark
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Medium
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Accompanying value information:
View Amethyst Profile

The International Gem Society (IGS) has a list of businesses offering gemstone appraisal services.

Value for amethysts depends almost entirely on color. Siberian mines once produced the world’s finest stones.  They featured a particularly rich purple color that glowed with red and blue flashes. Today the term “Siberian” no longer refers to origins. Instead, this is now a trade and grade term referring to colors similar to those of the amethysts mined in Siberia.

Zambian amethyst with Siberian color

This 2.55-ct amethyst from Zambia possesses the coveted “Siberian” color. Round brilliant cut, 9 mm. © The Gem Trader. Used with permission.

Although Siberian reigns atop the value listing, light-colored amethyst has enjoyed a resurgence in popularity. The lightest, pinkish violet shades are called “Rose de France,” a clever bit of marketing. The artistry of gemstone faceting can shine through these gems if given fancy and unusual cuts.

rose de France amethyst

Rose de France Amethyst, 11.3 ct, faceted with an Ultra Tec V5 and Fantasy Machine. © Hashnu Stones & Gems. Used with permission.

Since amethyst is readily available in large sizes, its value per carat climbs gradually, not exponentially. Since this stone is plentiful, there is little reason to pay top dollar for pieces with visible inclusions or inferior cutting.

For more information on amethyst value and quality factors, consult our amethyst buying guide.

amethyst ring with floral motif

Flower ring with 6 mm amethyst center stone and 2.5 mm accent amethysts. Photo by CustomMade. Used with permission.